Vesta & Hestia

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Vesta & Hestia

Postby Lucius Tyrrhenus Garrulus on Wed Jun 15, 2005 9:44 pm

SALVETE OMNES, S.V.B.E.V.

I was thinking of writing an article on Vesta, if the rector will have it, and I was wondering if some kind folks would point out some differences and similarities between Vesta and her Greek cousin.
Any help or guidance in this matter is appreciated.

VALETE BENE.
NOX EST PERPETVA VNA DORMIENDA
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Postby Quintus Aurelius Orcus on Fri Jun 17, 2005 11:49 am

Salve Garrule

I have no objections to it. Feel free to write about anything you want. I will see what I can dig up concerning similarities beteen Hestia and Vesta.
vale

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Postby Quintus Aurelius Orcus on Fri Jun 17, 2005 8:04 pm

Salve Garrule

I'm sure Piscine can add information on Vesta, but this is what I have come up with so far. Vesta and Hestia are deities of whom we have little information (especially Hestia). We do know that they both played a pivotal role in both private and state religion. They were the centre of all. In ancient Greece and later in Rome, family members would offer (I think) leftovers from their dinner to Hestia and later to Vesta.
The head of the family had the job of maintaining this ritual as to keeping the fire going in their home. In Hellenic polytheism, the hearth is the centre of the religion. I suppose in Roman polytheism its the same. Unlike in Rome, the Hellenic head of the family was supposed to keep the fire of his home going by fetching new fire from the temple where fire was continually kept burning. That fire like with the Vestal fire, was considered sacred. I do not know what the penalties were for letting the fire go out, but I can imagine it wasn't pretty.
In Rome, Vesta had a temple, where the fire was kept burning for forever or it was supposed to last forever. Those Vestal virgins who dared to let the fire go out where usually killed by burying them alive. I suppose Piscine can explained it better, but I think that that fire was the centre of Roman state religion. The private worship differ between Roman and Hellenic practices.
vale

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Postby Lucius Tyrrhenus Garrulus on Mon Jun 20, 2005 8:43 pm

Multas gratias Quinte.
I'll get started right away.
Vale bene.
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Re: Vesta & Hestia

Postby Cleopatra Aelia on Sat Jun 25, 2005 2:27 pm

Salve Garrule,

Lucius Tyrrhenus Garrulus wrote:I was thinking of writing an article on Vesta, if the rector will have it,


I wonder if you would consider contributing your article to the essay contest of Scerio. More to that see the post in "General" under the topic "Essay Contest".
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Postby Lucius Tyrrhenus Garrulus on Tue Jun 28, 2005 6:49 pm

Salve.
Sure, if I can make the deadline I'll definitely submit it.
Vale bene.
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Postby Anonymous on Fri Aug 12, 2005 2:26 am

Ave Aureli Orce,

If I may add a few clarifications.

Quintus Aurelius Orcus wrote:
We do know that they both played a pivotal role in both private and state religion. They were the centre of all. In ancient Greece and later in Rome, family members would offer (I think) leftovers from their dinner to Hestia and later to Vesta.


"The name Vesta comes from the Greeks, for she is the goddess whom they call Hestia. Her power extends over altars and hearths, and therefore all prayers and all sacrifices end with this goddess, because she is the guardian of the innermost things. Closely related to this function are the Penates or household gods." - Cicero, De Natura Deorum 2.27


In Rome, Vesta had a temple, where the fire was kept burning for forever or it was supposed to last forever. Those Vestal virgins who dared to let the fire go out where usually killed by burying them alive.


Actually, they were beaten.

"Their chief office was to watch by turns, night and day, the everlasting fire which blazed upon the altar of Vesta (VIRGINESQUE VESTALES IN URBE CUSTODIUNTO IGNEM FOCI PUBLICI SEMPITERNUM, Cic. de Leg. ii.8.12; Liv. xxviii.11; Val. Max. i.1 §6; Senec. de Prov. 5), its extinction being considered as the most fearful of all prodigies, and emblemate of the extinction of the state (Dionys. ii.67; Liv. xxvi.1). If such misfortune befell and was caused by the carefulness of the priestess on discovery, she was stripped and scourged by the Pontifex Maximus, in the dark and with a screen interposed, and he rekindled the flame by the friction of two pieces of wood from a felix arbor (Dionys., Plut, Val. Max. ll. cc.; Festus, s.v. Ignis). "

Quote from "A Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities," at
http://penelope.uchicago.edu/Thayer/E/R ... tales.html

A Vestal was buried alive for violatiing her vow of chastity only (see above link for this also).

Incidentally, the fire on the altar of Vesta was ceremonially rekindled each year on the Kalends of March, beginning the new sacral year.

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Postby Q Valerius on Sun Aug 14, 2005 6:03 am

I think the consensus is that the deadline is at the end of August? I'm starting a new job as a waiter at a better restaurant so money should be coming in better, thus internet should be restored soon at home.

I have two essays, and seeking more. Can't wait to have yours also.

best,

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