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Salvete omnes,

doesn't Ovid mention dancing as a social activity in his Ars Amatoria?

I'll have to look it up.

Valete,
by Victoria Aurelia Ovensa
on Sat Sep 09, 2006 8:50 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Vitae Quotidianae
Topic: Dancing in Rome
Replies: 5
Views: 3720

Salve, Valeri, Many people do not classify English as a Germanic tongue. It has a basic Germanic grammar, but the bulk of its vocabulary is derived from Latin and later Romance languages. English is really a unique language that cannot be comfortably classified in any of the existing language gro...
by Victoria Aurelia Ovensa
on Sat Sep 09, 2006 8:47 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Linguarum
Topic: Letters as Representations of Sounds
Replies: 18
Views: 8985

Salve Mari, :lol: I had to laugh as I read your reply, because you're right, the character is most aggravating! And I'm embarrassed to say, I never did consider the fact of her possessing the Liber/Libera plaque in the first place, in light of her complete ignorance. Perhaps she is meant to ...
by Victoria Aurelia Ovensa
on Sat Sep 09, 2006 8:33 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Artium et Litterarum
Topic: Antiquity and science fiction
Replies: 10
Views: 3876

Q Valerius Scerio wrote:Er, that website you linked disagreed with you. The [j] sound is the modern English Y. Learn IPA. The modern English J is actually [dʒ].


Thank you.
by Victoria Aurelia Ovensa
on Fri Sep 08, 2006 9:21 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Linguarum
Topic: Letters as Representations of Sounds
Replies: 18
Views: 8985

Re: J and W

Salvete iterum... The [j] sound has, as you've stated, a very long pedigree. But the letter "J", as a distinct symbol for that sound, dates only from the late Middle Ages. Apparently telling students that those were initial-I's as opposed to middle-of-the-word I's wasn't enough anym...
by Victoria Aurelia Ovensa
on Fri Sep 08, 2006 9:20 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Linguarum
Topic: Letters as Representations of Sounds
Replies: 18
Views: 8985

Salvete omnes,

I hate to say it, but I probably would have ended up a courtesan or some rich guy's mistress. Never was the matronly type...

:oops:
by Victoria Aurelia Ovensa
on Fri Sep 08, 2006 1:43 am
 
Forum: Collegium Artium et Litterarum
Topic: *Your* Roman life
Replies: 18
Views: 8888

Though not really sci-fi, but "Household Gods" by Judith Tarr and Harry Turtledove is about a woman who is transported by Roman gods back in time to ancient Rome and must learn to cope with life as it was (she is almost unbelievably ignorant about the most common knowledge of ancient times...
by Victoria Aurelia Ovensa
on Fri Sep 08, 2006 12:23 am
 
Forum: Collegium Artium et Litterarum
Topic: Antiquity and science fiction
Replies: 10
Views: 3876

Ars Amatoria

Salvete omnes!! Was Ovid's Ars Amatoria ever taken seriously as a manual of seduction, or was it perceived mostly as a satirical piece by contemporaries and those to follow? I understand there is speculation it was for the Ars that he was banished to Romania, but it is not known for certain; with...
by Victoria Aurelia Ovensa
on Fri Sep 08, 2006 12:08 am
 
Forum: Collegium Artium et Litterarum
Topic: Ars Amatoria
Replies: 2
Views: 1685

But the J doesn't sound like a modern English J. Also, you'll rarely see J in Latin texts, and never in Ancient Latin texts. It was a medieval invention. Why do we need this standardization you ask for? http://www.orbilat.com/Languages/Latin/Grammar/Latin-Pronunciation-Syllable-Ac...
by Victoria Aurelia Ovensa
on Thu Sep 07, 2006 5:56 am
 
Forum: Collegium Linguarum
Topic: Letters as Representations of Sounds
Replies: 18
Views: 8985

Pronunciation questions

Salwete omnes, I am very new at all this, so I hope you'll bear with me and my silly questions. First off, how does one pronounce "Janus"? Is it JAY-NOOS, or JAH-NOOS (as in "ha, ha") ? or JAN-OOS (as in "can") ? And how are you supposed to know the vowel pro...
by Victoria Aurelia Ovensa
on Fri Sep 01, 2006 5:34 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Linguarum
Topic: Pronunciation questions
Replies: 4
Views: 3115

What would you propose for the consonantal I? Y wouldn't work, since it's also the vowel Y borrowed from Greek? And then what about Ecclesiastical Latin? It pronounces the V like an English V, not like an English W. Why bother adding even more confusion to it? Finally, works in Latin are universal,...
by Victoria Aurelia Ovensa
on Fri Sep 01, 2006 5:16 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Linguarum
Topic: Letters as Representations of Sounds
Replies: 18
Views: 8985

Salvete I'm just trowing my voice into this discussion but from what i know is what was said here before. Roman wome gradually saw their status changing in a good way but from what i know, this right was a privilige only the patrician and rich women gained. Others probably didn't have this. I think...
by Victoria Aurelia Ovensa
on Fri Sep 01, 2006 1:32 am
 
Forum: Collegium Vitae Quotidianae
Topic: Roman Women
Replies: 16
Views: 12722

Salwete, Pretty much all peoples of the world practiced cannibalism at some point or other in their history, some until fairly recently. In one branch of my family, my ancestors were cannibals into the early-to-mid-1800s. You have to remember that in almost all cannibalistic societies, people w...
by Victoria Aurelia Ovensa
on Fri Sep 01, 2006 1:13 am
 
Forum: Collegium Vitae Quotidianae
Topic: Cannibalism during Dark ages
Replies: 4
Views: 2924

Salwete,

was this regard for the left hand as evil or unclean perhaps of the same origin as the corresponding belief today among Muslims and certain Asian populations - the use of the left hand for cleaning one's self after excretion?
by Victoria Aurelia Ovensa
on Fri Sep 01, 2006 1:04 am
 
Forum: Collegium Vitae Quotidianae
Topic: South Paws
Replies: 7
Views: 3925

Salwete omnes, It seems that in the information given previously, all the dancing was indeed for the Gods, which could be construed as only being done by those in the roles of "priests and priestesses", or at the very least, devotees. I believe such dancing falls within the categories...
by Victoria Aurelia Ovensa
on Fri Sep 01, 2006 12:58 am
 
Forum: Collegium Vitae Quotidianae
Topic: Dancing in Rome
Replies: 5
Views: 3720

Actually, it's often the poor folks who eat anything and everything. "Waste not, want not". Any part of an animal that's even vaguely edible will be made palateable and eaten. Just look at any traditional Chinese cookbook and you will find recipes using various animals' tails, feet, innar...
by Victoria Aurelia Ovensa
on Fri Sep 01, 2006 12:49 am
 
Forum: Collegium Vitae Quotidianae
Topic: Strange eating habits
Replies: 8
Views: 4445

Letters as Representations of Sounds

Salwete Omnes, I am new here. My name is Thais Aurelia Owensa. I have a question relating to what you may have noticed is my non-standard way of spelling Latin words. I understand that the Latin alphabet (which has evolved into our own) used the character "V" to represent the sounds we...
by Victoria Aurelia Ovensa
on Fri Sep 01, 2006 12:04 am
 
Forum: Collegium Linguarum
Topic: Letters as Representations of Sounds
Replies: 18
Views: 8985

What about Interlingua (the artificially-created "modern Latin" language)? It is largely based on Latin but vastly simplified, i.e. no changing endings or gender forms etc. Very easy to learn for a speaker of any Romance language or heavily Romance-influenced language such as English. Scan...
by Victoria Aurelia Ovensa
on Thu Aug 31, 2006 11:08 pm
 
Forum: Collegium Linguarum
Topic: Why and How did Latin Die?
Replies: 22
Views: 12336

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